• Animal Welfare Hotline: 0711 479 453

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  • Introduction

  • Conservation

  • Volunteering

 

 

 

Jonathan and Angie Scott live in Kenya and spend much of their time in the company of African wildlife.  Their wildlife photography, wildlife pencil drawings, and wildlife books have won awards and recognition throughout the world while their stock images are represented by many of the world's top photographic agencies. The Scotts have dedicated much of their lives to wildlife conservation and are patrons of a number of wildlife conservation societies. Since 2012, they have been supporting Colobus Conservation.

 

“As conservationists, we welcomed the opportunity to join hands with a local conservation initiative that we know has made a significant difference to the welfare of one of Kenya’s most charismatic primates – the exquisitely-marked Angolan colobus. The organisation pioneered the innovative construction of flexible ladders, which are strung across the roads of Diani at treetop height to cut down on road kills. They also prompted the insulation of some of the deadly power lines, which are taking a heavy toll on the population of colobus in this country.” Jonathan & Angie Scott

 

Like Jonathan and Angie, you can support Colobus Conservation via: http://www.colobusconservation.org/index.php/donate/fundcolobus

 

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Forest & Primate Programs

The key aim of Colobus Conservation is to identify and undertake projects that will give a direct impact to primate and/or forest conservation in south eastern Kenya. Specifically, the core programs are focused on five main areas of human/primate conflict while cross-cutting these core programs is Colobus Conservation's [animal welfare] and [education programs].

 

Our main program areas are:

Habitat Loss

Primate Pest Management

Road Injuries & Mortalities

Primate Electrocutions

Snaring of Primates & Primates as Pets (Rehabilitation & Release)

 

Betsy01 scaled

Betsy - The hand reared Colobus Monkey

Betsy was found abandoned when she was only two weeks old - this was in January 2011. Neither zoos nor Colobus Conservation had success in raising infant colobus of this subspecies previously however, new methods were employed which brought startling results. Betsy is now a year and a half old and visits the wild colobus group daily in preparation for her final release.

Mrima Hill

Mining at Mrima Hill

Mrima Hill forest holds Kenya's fifth largest population of south coast's subspecies of colobus monkeys. It is also gazetted as a forest reserve & National Monument. Regardless, this hill is targeted for opencast mining which will require the stripping of the surface of the hill - or in other words, 100% biological destruction.
Colobus in Tree

Colobus angolensis palliatus repository of information

Colobus Conservation has pulled together available information on this colobus subspecies. We urge people to use this repository freely. We also urge people to Contact Us with additions, corrections and comments, keeping our records up-to-date. [IUCN Red List][Reports & Publication]

Morning Cleaning of Cages

We have been offering volunteer positions for more than 18 years at our location along the world class beach in Diani, Kenya, and are now well regarded in volunteering circles around the world!

 

- Gain valuable experience in your area of interest;

- Take a career break or try your career skills in a new setting;

- Do your thesis field work with us - on site or data analysis in your own country.

 

When you come and volunteer with us, you will be carrying out primate and forest conservation activities which make a real difference!

 

While we are looking for foresters and primatologists, we also need people from all walks of life, so we are always looking for skills from a diverse background including experience in photography, journalism, teaching, GIS, as well as artists, builders and filmmakers - though this list is far from complete!!

 

We are located along one of the best beaches in the world, with hotel nightlife, restaurants and modern hospital facilities. Combine conservation with a beach holiday!

If you are a student looking for field work opportunities for a undergraduate, master's or doctoral thesis, we have a support infrastructure and unique location that allows students a great opportunity to find unique and ecologically important topics to study. Get in touch to talk to us about possible options. Click here. 
Carry out data analysis in your own country. We have data that needs analysis.  If you are looking for a degree project for your Bachelor's or Master's degree, this may be of interest.  There would be no need to be on-site for this.... Do this from your own country.

 

Colobus Conservation’s ‘colobridges’ are a well known sight along the Diani highway providing safe, canopy level passage over the road for the resident monkeys. Read more


In 1965, the existing dirt road through Diani Beach was sealed to provide better access to this popular tourist destination and by 2011 daily traffic volume exceeded 3000 vehicles. Colobus Conservation was formed in 1996 to address the issue of monkeys being hit by cars on the Diani Beach road. In 1997, the first colobridge, a simple construction of rope and wooden rungs, was installed at a mortality hotspot. By 2010, twenty-eight bridges had been erected.

 

Two studies, surveying all colobridges, have been conducted, the first in 2004 and the second in 2011, with the aim of assessing the level of use of the colobridges. Each bridge was observed for two 12-hour days from 6am – 6pm incorporating almost all the daylight hours. Using an example of Sykes monkeys on the Mitton Bridge (located at the old Colobus Trust site), the studies show that bridge use between 2004 and 2011 increased dramatically by 76% while road crossings in the area beneath the bridge decreased by 175%. There was no significant difference in population size of the Sykes monkey between the two studies (725:2004; 735:2011).

 

Table 1. Syke’s monkeys total crossing counts for two 12-hour days on one bridge in Diani Beach

 

Location of crossing

2004

2011

Bridge

34

143

Road

44

16

Total

78

159

 

The Mitton Bridge was erected in 2000 immediately after two incidences of road deaths occurred in that location. Three more incidences occurred within two years of the colobridge being installed. In the ten years after that (2002-2012), only one incident has been recorded.

 

All else being equal, these studies suggest that annually, crossings via bridge and road by Sykes monkeys at the Mitton Bridge, increased from about 14,000 to 29,000 of which bridge crossings accounted for about 6,000 in 2004 and 26,000 in 2011. While traffic under the bridge increased by 17% during this time, rate of injury or mortality in that area remained at almost zero.

 

However, between 1999 and 2012, despite numerous colobridges being in place 518 monkeys were recorded as injured or killed by vehicles on the Diani Beach road. Colobridges reduce the risk of crossing roads to monkeys but risk is still present. To help reduce further the number of monkeys (and people) injured or killed on the Diani Beach road it is important that drivers observe the 50kph speed limit and slow down for the speed bumps. If you do witness a monkey being hit by a car (or injured in any other way) please call Colobus Conservation welfare hotline on 0711 479 453. Together we can help keep Diani’s wildlife wild!